Fusterland, Habana Vieja and Fried Taro Root

07 May 2013, Posted by admin in Packages, No Comments. Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Fusterland, Habana Vieja and Fried Taro Root


Students from a UC global studies class experience the many dynamics of the Cuban culture during spring trip.

Story and photos by Taylor Norton

Students in a University of Cincinnati global studies class traveled to Cuba in late March and experienced its beautiful sights, unique culture and rich history.

The trip was one of many travel courses hosted by UC’s honors program. Eight students – Courtney Smith, Kaitlyn Tyler, Casey Carver, Dominique Lawson, George Hakim, Isaac Dippold, Taylor Norton and Venessa Vera Cruz Naceno – traveled with Sean Hughes, UC educator assistant professor of journalism, and UC honors program staff member Jessica King. Each student had a study topic, from education to art to food.

Hughes was making his seventh trip to Cuba. Because he is so familiar with the country, and especially the capital city of Havana, Hughes was able to create an itinerary that let students experience the many dynamics of the culture.

The students visited Fusterland – the home of Cuban artist José Fuster – as well as Viñales Valley, Morro Castle, Ernest Hemingway’s home and Habana Vieja, or Old Havana.

They went to an organic farm, where vegetables such as taro root are grown. Like many of the vegetables that Cubans eat, taro root is often fried.

They visited restaurants run from the homes of Cubans, which showed the growth of private enterprise under Raúl Castro, the current president and younger brother of former president and Revolution leader Fidel Castro.

They bought strawberries alongside Cubans at a local market. They watched as old men played dominoes and young children played soccer. They listened to a professor talk about the recent history of U.S.-Cuba relations. They sat in the front room of the house of famed Cuban photographer Roberto Salas, who discussed the country’s politics and present-day affairs. And they talked to Cubans on the sidewalk of the Malecón, the avenue running along the shoreline of Havana that acts as a hangout spot for many.

At the end of the trip, students were able to form opinions about the country from their own experience – a main goal of the class.

Photos from this story were syndicated to and published by the Cincinnati Enquirer.

A Cuban farmer heads back into the fields at the Organopónico Vivero Alamar. The organic farm was started out of the necessity for food in the 1990s and is now thriving. Because the farm sells to restaurants and hotels that cater to tourists, the farmers are able to make a better salary than doctors.

A Cuban farmer heads back into the fields at the Organopónico Vivero Alamar. The organic farm was started out of the necessity for food in the 1990s and is now thriving. Because the farm sells to restaurants and hotels that cater to tourists, the farmers are able to make a better salary than doctors. View gallery of more photos.

Posting your comment...

You must be logged in to post a comment.

http://www.ucjournalism.org/wp-content/themes/press